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Top 7 Reasons Teens Drink Alcohol

Why Teens Drink Alcohol

Reasons Teens Abuse AlcoholDespite the fact that the legal age to drink alcohol is 21, more and more teens are abusing alcohol than at almost any time in recent history. Not only are teens trying alcohol earlier than they ever have before, around 11 years old, but teens are also combining alcohol with other drugs such as marijuana, cocaine, ecstasy, crystal meth, and heroin. If you’re a concerned parent and just can’t understand why your teen has been abusing alcohol, you may want to look at the situation from their point of view, as well as their motives behind drinking. Only by clearly understanding the reasons teens drink alcohol, can you help them to understand the error of their ways and educate them on the true dangers of alcohol abuse.

Reason #1: Peer Pressure

Peer pressure has long been, and continues to be, one of the major reasons why teens and young adults abuse alcohol. Because teens often feel pressure from their peers to partake in alcohol consumption, they often fear rejection and are afraid to look like an outcast to the rest of the group. Many young adults may also feel what is known as silent peer pressure which refers to the act of seeing their peers drinking and feeling the compulsion to drink as well.

Reason #2: Risk Taking

While for some teens thrill-seeking may include playing football, driving fast, or riding a motorcycle, other teens may exhibit thrill-seeking with experimenting with drugs or alcohol. Because the teenage brain has not yet fully developed, it can be prone to acting impulsively and teenagers do not always recognize the dangerousness of their actions. Mixing alcohol with this impulsive behavior can be downright destructive.

Reason #3: Problems at Home

Another common reason why many teens and young adults start drinking is because of problems at home including divorce, poverty, loss of a parent, etc. When teens are experiencing serious problems at home they can often begin abusing alcohol as a coping mechanism, as well as cry for help. Divorce and loss of a parent are generally some of the most common reasons why a teen may begin abusing alcohol, and for some teens, it can spark the beginning of a life-long addiction.

Reason #4: Media Influence

Because teens and young adults are so impressionable during their adolescent years, they can become easily influenced by the glamorous portrayal of alcohol in TV, movies, and pop culture. It is important as a parent to monitor what type of media your child is consuming and make sure to always let them know of the true dangers and reality of alcohol addiction.

Reason #5: Genetics

According to multiple studies done about alcoholism and genetics, the risk of alcoholism greatly increases for a teen that has a parent who regularly abuses alcohol. Children from alcoholic families are not only more prone to begin drinking at an earlier age than their peers, but they have a much higher risk for developing an alcohol addiction later in life.

Reason #6: Curiosity

Another main reason why teens and young adults drink alcohol is because of pure curiosity. Because alcohol is so glamorized in out media and pop culture today, many teens may just be curious to experiment with alcohol and to understand for themselves what all the fuss is about. If you feel your teen is becoming curious about alcohol consumption, feel free to explain to them the dangers of consuming alcohol, or better yet, take them to an AA meeting and let them see it for themselves first hand.

Reason #7: Feeling Older

Teens and young adults often consume alcohol in hopes that it will make them feel older and more mature. Because only adults are legally allowed to consume alcohol, teens often view it as a way to look cool and act like adults. However, what you need to help your teen realize is that adult actives come with adult problems and consequences, and alcohol addiction and dependency is extremely difficult for adults to get over, let alone teenagers.

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